Posts Tagged ‘Duncan Keith’

Top Line: Will Avs trade for Ryan Miller?; cap punishes fans; more links

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Goaltender Ryan Miller of the Buffalo Sabres

Ryan Miller’s future continues to be on of the summer’s hottest hockey topics. (Bill Wippert/NHLI via Getty Images)

By Allan Muir

An annotated guide to this morning’s must-read hockey stories:

• The Avalanche need to trade for goalie Ryan Miller in order to become a serious playoff contender, at least according to Mark Kiszla. I’m not convinced there’s anything to the spate of Miller-to-Colorado rumors during the last couple of days, but getting him out of Buffalo might be the only thing that can revive his deteriorating game.

• This season’s artificially low salary cap is a kick in the teeth to fans of high-revenue teams, writes Tony Gallagher. It’s an interesting take . . . and hardly the first time the league has punished its most loyal customers.

• The Predators’ Mike Fisher suffered a surprising injury over the weekend. I suspect the incident might make its way into an on-ice exchange or two this season.

• What’s keeping UFA defenseman Tom Gilbert from signing a new deal? Money or the slipping play that saw him benched more than once with the Wild last season?

• The story of Oilers hopeful Will Acton is required reading for kids hoping to one day make the NHL. He’s proof that if you play the game the right way, you don’t need to be a big scorer to get your chance.

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  • Published On Sep 02, 2013
  • Steve Yzerman’s 10 Team Canada locks: Who are they?

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    Sidney Crosby at the Vancouver Olympics

    Golden boy Sidney Crosby looks like a pretty safe bet to get a roster spot. (YURI KADOBNOV/AFP/Getty Images)

    By Allan Muir

    On Sunday,  47 players will gather in Calgary for Team Canada’s Olympic orientation camp with 25 tickets to Sochi up for grabs — though none of those tickets will actually be won during the four days of meetings. (The players won’t even take the ice because of prohibitive insurance costs.) Officially, the competition is wide open. Unofficially, some spots are loudly spoken for.

    “There are probably, conservatively, maybe 10 locks,” said Steve Yzerman, executive director of Team Canada. “We’re taking 25 players. Ten may be a conservative number, sure, but half of this team is available for guys to make. At least half.”

    MUIR: Breaking down Team Canada’s invite list

    Those are welcome words for the kids who have something to prove, including Taylor Hall, Jordan Eberle and P.K. Subban, and for the veterans, such as Martin St. Louis, who hope to show that they still have enough left in the tank to contribute to another gold-medal run. And it may be even better news for such players as Jason Spezza, Joffrey Lupul and others who didn’t earn an invite to camp, but who nevertheless hope to catch Yzerman’s eye with a hot start when the NHL season opens, just as Patrice Bergeron did back in 2009.

    So who are the 10 locks? Here’s our best guess:

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  • Published On Aug 23, 2013
  • Stanley Cup Final: Report Card for Blackhawks’ Cup-clinching win

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    Chicago's Corey Crawford earned top marks for standing tall against the Bruins in the Cup-clinching Game 6 win.

    Chicago’s Corey Crawford earned top marks for standing tall against the Bruins in Game 6. (David E. Klutho/SI)

    By Allan Muir

    Here is a completely subjective look at some of the key elements in Chicago’s Stanley Cup-clinching 3-2 Game 6 win over the Boston Bruins:

    Goaltending

    Corey Crawford, Chicago: If there was one box left unchecked on Crawford’s record during these playoffs, it was that he’d yet to steal a game like all the great keepers had. We can’t say that anymore. Tonight, he was Glenn Hall and Tony Esposito wrapped up in one glorious goaltending package during a first-period assault that saw him singlehandedly repel the black and gold hordes. While his teammates struggled to match Boston’s intensity, Crawford battled to track the puck through a forest of bodies out front and consistently controlled his rebounds, limiting the second and third chances that haunted him at times during this postseason. Those early frustrations seemed to eat away at Boston’s confidence, leading them to over-pass or get a little too cute with their shots as the game progressed.

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  • Published On Jun 25, 2013
  • Stanley Cup Final: Game 2 Report Card for Bruins’ OT win over Blackhawks

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    Corey Crawford gave up the game-winning goal to Daniel Paille at 13:48 of the first overtime period. (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

    Corey Crawford (pictured) gave up the game-winning goal to Daniel Paille in the first OT period. (Getty Images)

    By Allan Muir

    Here is a completely subjective look at some of the key elements in Boston’s 2-1 overtime win over Chicago in Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Final:

    Goaltending

    Boston: This game would have gotten out of hand early if not for yet another heroic effort from the unflappable Finn. Tuukka Rask made 34 stops on the night, including six in extra time, and while there were stretches where his rebounds started getting away from him, it’s hard to argue with one goal surrendered in nearly 75 minutes of hockey. A

    Chicago: Corey Crawford barely broke a sweat during a lopsided first period, but made some big stops with his glove as the Bruins got their legs moving. There wasn’t much he could do on Boston’s first goal, an ugly but effective net crash by Chris Kelly, but there was a play to be made on Daniel Paille’s OT winner. Crawford moved across his crease effectively, but failed to track the puck as it came off Paille’s stick, allowing it to beat him far side under the arm. At that point of the game, Crawford has to make that stop. B-

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  • Published On Jun 16, 2013
  • NHL playoffs: Blackhawks will battle slumps, suspension in Game 4 vs. Kings

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    Brent Seabrook and Jonathan Toews in the 2013 Western Conference Finals

    Brent Seabrook (left) must play smart and the Hawks could use some points from Jonathan Toews. (Getty Images)

    By Allan Muir

    It doesn’t take much to shift momentum during the NHL playoffs.

    The Chicago Blackhawks dominated the Los Angeles Kings through the first two games of the Western Conference Finals, controlling the neutral zone and picking apart LA’s defense with a series of quick precision passes that allowed them to test goaltender Jonathan Quick repeatedly and with great success.

    But the Hawks weren’t a particularly good team in Game 3 on Tuesday night. The energy wasn’t there. Neither was the puck possession that left the Kings spinning their wheels in Chicago. And so instead of knocking out the defending champs when they had the chance, they allowed them to crawl up out of the ditch with a 3-1 win.

    And all of a sudden, the wind has changed direction.

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  • Published On Jun 06, 2013
  • Top Line: Bruins’ Campbell joins playoff lore; Hawks lose Keith; more links

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    By Allan Muir

    An annotated guide to this morning’s must-read hockey stories:

    • I wrote yesterday about how playing with pain was the price for pursuing the Cup. (SI.com’s Stu Hackel also offered up a take with some examples from the mists of time.) Looks like we can add Gregory Campbell’s name to the list of players marked Paid In Full. And if you don’t realize how critical this fourth liner is to Boston’s fortunes, well, you haven’t been paying attention to the Bruins. He and his minutes will be tough to replace.

    • Campbell’s heroic play typifies what the Bruins have become during these playoffs.

    • I’ve been telling my two hockey-playing sons to watch certain players through the years to help mold their impressions of how the game should be played. This guy has been at the very top of that list all along. I think they’re finally starting to understand why.

    • Maybe, just maybe, the Bruins picked up the right greybeard at the trade deadline. Haven’t liked much of Jaromir Jagr’s game during these playoffs, but that was a veteran move leading up to last night’s game-winner.

    • The Penguins got the superlative bounce-back effort they needed from Tomas Vokoun. But there wasn’t any solution for this goaltending problem.

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  • Published On Jun 06, 2013
  • NHL playoffs: Blackhawks humble Kings 4-2, grab 2-0 series advantage

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    Anze Kopitar (left) has struggled to keep up with Bryan Bickell and the rest of the Blackhawks (Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

    Anze Kopitar (left) has struggled to keep up with Bryan Bickell and the rest of the Blackhawks. (Getty Images)

    By Adrian Dater

    Remember when the Chicago Blackhawks were “panicked” about their playoff situation, and how their exit visas from the postseason seemed imminent? Down three games to one against Detroit in the Western Conference semifinals, tee-time jokes about the Presidents’ Trophy winners abounded.

    Five straight Blackhawks victories later, the Red Wings have been playing golf for a few days and unless the defending Stanley Cup champion Los Angeles Kings win four of the next five games, they’ll be free to make reservations at the country club, too.

    Chicago easily beat the Kings, 4-2, in Game 2 of the Western Conference Finals on Sunday at the United Center to take a 2-0 lead in the best-of-seven series. The action now shifts to the Staples Center for two games.

    While the Blackhawks keep getting stronger after facing their big moment of adversity against Detroit, the Kings look like a fatigued, beaten-up squad that’s in sudden disarray.

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  • Published On Jun 02, 2013
  • Chicago’s Duncan Keith an equal opportunity antagonist

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    Duncan Keith made some questionable comments toward a female reporter this week. (Jimmy Simmons/Icon SMI)

    Duncan Keith made some questionable comments toward a female reporter this week. (Jimmy Simmons/Icon SMI)

    By Allan Muir

    So Duncan Keith is being pilloried as a sexist this morning. Maybe he should be, maybe not. All I know for sure is that he has dealt with scores of female reporters over the course of his eight-year NHL career. The fact that none of them has joined in the public dog pile is telling.

    But Keith might get stuck with the tag after the text of his dismissive exchange with Karen Thomson, a reporter with Team 1040 radio in Vancouver, went viral.

    Thomson caught up with Keith Monday night after the Hawks were manhandled in Vancouver. Her question about a missed penalty call leading to the Canucks’ third goal might have been off the mark, but it wasn’t unreasonable.

    Keith’s response, on the other hand, was the sort of defensive outburst any seasoned reporter has seen dozens of times.

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  • Published On Apr 23, 2013
  • Top Line: Duncan Keith, Tyler Seguin speak first, think later; more links

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    Tyler Seguin

    Tyler Seguin apologized for a homophobic tweet, but could face further discipline. (Michael Tureski/Icon SMI)

    By Allan Muir

    An annotated guide to this morning’s must-read hockey stories:

    • A couple of the NHL’s biggest stars stirred up controversy last night with some poorly chosen words. In Vancouver, Duncan Keith took a swipe at a female reporter’s credibility in a postgame interview. Earlier, Tyler Seguin threw down a casually homophobic slur on Twitter. While he deleted the tweet and apologized, he’ll probably have to answer for it in some fashion. It’ll be very interesting to see what action the league/PA take in the wake of the NHL’s recent partnership with the You Can Play Project.

    • Everyone understands that ticket prices go up for the playoffs, but the Maple Leafs are really putting the screws to their long-suffering fans.

    • Unlikely heroes powered the Winnipeg Jets to a huge win over the Sabres, setting up tonight’s battle against the Capitals with the Southeast division lead on the line.

    • Here’s the view from Washington.

    Read More…


  • Published On Apr 23, 2013
  • Game to watch: Blackhawks host Sharks with NHL record on the line

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    Jonathan Toews and Joe Thornton fought in their last meeting.

    The last time the Hawks met the Sharks, Jonathan Toews and Joe Thornton squared off. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

    By Allan Muir

    Sharks at Blackhawks: 7:30 CST, NHL Network (US), CSN Chicago, CSN California

    The set-up

    The Blackhawks can lay claim to the best start in NHL history against the Sharks tonight. Their shootout win over Vancouver on Wednesday gave Chicago a point in 16 straight games and a share of the current mark set in 2006-07 by the Anaheim Ducks. They’ll face a feckless San Jose side that finally snapped a seven-game losing streak with a 2-1 win over St. Louis on Tuesday. After going unbeaten in their first seven games, the Sharks have seen their offense go cold, but they’re coming off two days of practice time that allowed them to work on the power play and at generating chances five-on-five.

    This will be the third meeting between these two teams in 18 days, so familiarity may breed contempt. It’ll be worth watching to see if any hostilities carry over from their last get-together, when captains Jonathan Toews and Joe Thornton dropped the gloves.

    Keys to the game

    • Blackhawks: Get a lead and stomp down hard on the gas pedal. They allowed the Canucks to dictate the pace early on Wednesday, then coasted through the third period after a thoroughly dominant second, ultimately coughing up a point with sloppy play and lazy penalties as the game wore down. They can’t afford to let the Sharks circle and wait for them to let up.

    • Sharks: Commit to ugly, goalmouth hockey. There’s no offensive flow on this team right now. They’ve scored two goals or less in regulation in nine of their last 10 games and the power play that propelled their hot start has just two goals to show for its last 42 chances. So forget pretty and fight off the instinct to make that one last pass. Get as many pucks on net as possible and follow them to the crease with grim purpose.

    • Probable starting goalies: Ray Emery (6-0-0, 2.27 GAA, .925 save pct.) vs. Antti Niemi (7-2-3, 1.86, .933)

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  • Published On Feb 22, 2013


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