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Dodger Stadium may be hosting an outdoor NHL game in 2014

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dodger-stadium

The Big House in Ann Arbor will be hosting the 2014 Winter Classic, but Dodger Stadium may get an outdoor game of its own next year. (Harry How/Getty Images)

By Allan Muir

On the morning that the NHL confirmed the details for the 2014 Winter Classic, rumors started flying about additional outdoor games…and one gained immediate traction.

Moments after NHL COO John Collins spoke at the Winter Classic presser about the possibility for additional outdoor games to be added to the schedule as soon as next season, outspoken player agent Allan Walsh tweeted that a “deal is done” for Dodger Stadium to host an event in 2014.

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  • Published On Apr 07, 2013
  • 2014 NHL Winter Classic to be held in…

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    Just as originally planned for this year before the lockout led to its cancellation, Ann Arbor's Michigan Stadium will host the 2014 Winter Classic between the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Detroit Red Wings on New Year's Day.

    Just as originally planned for this year before the lockout led to its cancellation, Ann Arbor’s Michigan Stadium will host the 2014 Winter Classic on New Year’s Day. (Dave Reginek/Getty Images)

    By Allan Muir

    Alright, no real surprise here. The league finally got around to confirming this morning that the 2014 NHL Winter Classic will be exactly where the 2013 NHL Winter Classic was supposed to be, except this time it will, you know, actually take place.

    So we’ll have the Red Wings taking on the Maple Leafs at the Big House in Ann Arbor, Mich. on New Year’s Day for what looks to be the biggest game in NHL history. Certainly the biggest in terms of attendance, and probably in terms of hype as well. Read More…


  • Published On Apr 07, 2013
  • Top Line: Winter Classic update; Hansen faces hearing; more links

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    Michigan Stadium will be the site of the 2014 Winter Classic

    Wait ’til next year: Michigan Stadium will finally get to host the biggest Winter Classic ever. (Paul Sancya/AP)

    By Allan Muir

    A guide to this morning’s must-read hockey stories:

    • The Toronto Star quotes sources as saying the Maple Leafs will meet the Red Wings in Ann Arbor for the 2014 NHL Winter Classic.

    • Jannik Hansen of the Canucks has a 3:30 p.m. meeting today with Brendan Shanahan in the wake of what Hansen called “a hockey play.”

    • The view from Vancouver: it wasn’t even a penalty. Maybe it’s just the cynic in me, but I’m guessing that they might have felt differently about the play had it been Henrik Sedin face-down on the ice.

    • No link, just a repeat of a question I asked last night: I see players drop the gloves to avenge a fallen teammate after a hard but legal hit all the time. So where were all those honor-bound Blackhawks after Hansen’s cheap shot? Pretty pathetic.

    • The headline in the New York Post after Montreal beat the Rangers said it all: Z’s the Day. Nice work by the editor who came up with that gem. And nice work by quote machine John Tortorella, who described it as “Two bad teams playing and we were worse than they were.” In Montreal’s room, there was praise for the two-way play of Lars Eller.

    • The Sabres turned in “a mistake-filled, passionless” performance in last night’s 2-1 loss to Winnipeg. The clock is ticking louder in Buffalo…

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  • Published On Feb 20, 2013
  • Big obstacles remain as talks resume

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    Gary Bettman

    Instead of filling the seats in The Big House for the Winter Classic, Commissioner Gary Bettman and the owners have stuck to their negotiating guns, which usually shoot down any NHLPA counter-proposals in a matter of minutes.
    (Paul Sancya/AP)

    By Stu Hackel

    Weary and wary, the hockey world awaits as negotiators for the NHL and the NHLPA resume CBA talks for the first time since Dec. 13.

    UPDATE: The sides adjourned for Monday after meeting a few hours with little substantial comment from either side. The league reviewed the union’s counter-proposal and they will get back together on Tuesday. You can watch Don Fehr’s remarks here and Gary Bettman’s here. TSN’s Aaron Ward and Darren Dreger had a bit more — but not much — here.

    What will the owners’ latest offer mean to this paralyzed professional league, which has locked out its players for 107 days, inflicted hardship on those whose incomes are dependent on games being played, and incurred justifiable ridicule and scorn from all corners?

    You expect some sports commentators who never have anything good to say about hockey to jump all over this fiasco, but when Devils President Lou Lamoriello says he’s “embarrassed” by this predicament, he echoes the sentiments of those who love the game as well.

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  • Published On Dec 31, 2012
  • Winter Classic cancelled by NHL’s latest act of self destruction

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    Gary Bettman and Winter Classic

    We interrupt this event to bring you the following dire announcement. (Dave Reginek/NHLI via Getty Images)

    By Stu Hackel

    As the old public relations maxim goes, “Always release bad news late on Fridays” because people will pay less attention to it once the weekend rolls around. So perhaps it is no coincidence that the NHL has dropped major cancellations on us each of the last two. Last week, it wiped out the November schedule and this time it cancelled one of its signature events — perhaps its main regular season event — the Winter Classic along with Detroit’s Hockeytown Festival, all victims of the stalled CBA negotiations and the owners’ lockout of the players.

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  • Published On Nov 02, 2012
  • Player anger, plea to save the Classic, more green spilled, and PK’s forecast

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    PK Subban

    The NHL forecast calls for more stalemate, lost revenue, no Winter Classic, and scrambling for side jobs. Loquacious Canadiens blueliner PK Subban may have found his calling. (Jana Chytilova/Freestyle Photography/Getty Images)

    By Stu Hackel

    It’s the end of October and the owners’ locks remain on the doors of all NHL facilities. The most interesting news from the battlefront so far this week is that NHLPA Executive Director Don Fehr traveled to Minnesota on Tuesday to meet with players and review the stalemated CBA negotiations.

    Reading some of the coverage of Fehr’s visit, like this story from Bruce Brothers of The St. Paul Pioneer-Press, it’s obvious that some of the players are angry, or at least bordering on it. And, as Michael Russo of The Minneapolis Star-Tribune wrote, some players are concerned about the long-term impact that the lockout will have on their careers. Those reactions are realities of the situation, but they don’t seem to have appreciably dented the union’s resolve.

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  • Published On Oct 31, 2012
  • Detroit’s Hockeytown Festival now in lockout’s crosshairs

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    Comerica Park Hockeytown Festival

    Detroit’s Comerica Park was set to host games between NHL alumni in addition to major junior, college, high school and youth teams. (Dave Reginek/NHLI via Getty Images)

    By Stu Hackel

    It’s Day 45 of the lockout, and the NHL season is still being held hostage. The owners and players are not talking and optimism remains in short supply. Each side claims it is the one that has made concessions and it accuses the other of wanting the lockout and being unwilling to compromise. Meanwhile, the schedule has started to evaporate and, as Helene Elliott wrote in The Los Angeles Times, “The NHL put the ‘no’ in November and continued its determined march toward irrelevance by canceling games through Nov. 30.”

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  • Published On Oct 30, 2012
  • Devellano’s cattle quote raises specter

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    Red Wings vice president Jimmy Devellano

    Red Wings VP Jimmy Devellano has been around the NHL for 45 years and has a reputation for speaking openly but not always wisely. (Dave Reginek/NHLI via Getty Images)

    By Stu Hackel

    Without negotiations toward a new CBA to mull over, it’s starting to get nasty out there. The clock is ticking and the ill will is rising.

    Apart from the chance that informal talks might take place on Monday evening — and they seem to contain little more than each side asking the other if they’ve budged and neither doing so — the NHL lockout entered its second week with little real movement; unless, that is, you count as “movement” more players signing to skate in Europe and the fine that the league levied against the Red Wings. We feared this would happen a month ago and predictions by some that the league could resume in time for the Winter Classic took a hit when Kevin McGran of The Toronto Star revealed last Friday that the NHL plans to cancel the game come November if no deal is in sight. The Wings’ Dan Cleary said Monday that he believes the impasse could surpass the last lockout.

    So hockey fans must be content with the public relations battle between the NHL and the NHLPA. On that front, Red Wings executive Jim Devellano did the owners no favors with his rather malevolent characterization of the players  — and all employees of the owners, himself included — as cattle, among other strange remarks he made in an interview.

    The league whacked the Red Wings, reported by some to be $250,000, for Jimmy D.’s remarks (although David Shoalts of The Globe and Mail doubts the NHL will bother to collect the money). Regardless, what Devellano said shows the wisdom of Gary Bettman’s prohibition on anyone among the owners or their minions speaking about anything concerning labor relations.

    The larger questions in this little brouhaha remain, however: how accurate is the picture that Devellano painted of the owners’ regard for players and others in their employ? And was that the worst of what Jimmy D. said?

    In case you haven’t read it yet elsewhere, here’s what Devellano told Scott Harrigan on the British Columbia website Island Sports News while discussing the explosion of contracts at big salary levels the owners doled out just prior to the lockout: “It’s very complicated and way too much for the average Joe to understand, but having said that, I will tell you this: The owners can basically be viewed as the Ranch, and the players, and me included, are the cattle. The owners own the Ranch and allow the players to eat there. That’s the way it’s always been and that’s the way it will be forever. And the owners simply aren’t going to let a union push them around. It’s not going to happen.”

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  • Published On Sep 24, 2012
  • Why another lost season is possible

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    The 2013 Winter Classic at Michigan Stadium will be the biggest edition of the popular event, but that may not be reason enough to force the owners and players to come to terms on a new CBA by January 1 if there is a lockout. (Dave Reginek/NHLI via Getty Images)

    By Stu Hackel

    The inevitable differences between the NHL owners and players on core economic issues finally got some articulation in the aftermath of Thursday’s collective bargaining negotiations. Commissioner Gary Bettman didn’t use the “L word,” but he came pretty damn close.

    So while the two sides will continue working on the non-economic parts of the CBA, those matters will be the sideshow compared to the action in the center ring of this circus. That part of the discussions will resume on Tuesday in Toronto when the NHLPA offers its counter-proposal to the owners’ opening shot of salary rollbacks and contractual givebacks. The chasm between what each side wants from the agreement was given its voice on Thursday when the players presented their objections to the owners’ proposed system of revenue sharing.

    Asked how far apart the sides are, NHLPA Executive Director Don Fehr responded, “There’s a meaningful gulf there.”

    Bettman: “We obviously have a wide gap to bridge on a whole host of issues.”

    No, this is not encouraging. And while many people think that a lockout-shortened season would likely begin with the Winter Classic on January 1, there are reasons to think again.

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  • Published On Aug 10, 2012
  • Winter Classic a boost for Detroit

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    Though the Winter Classic will be played in Ann Arbor, Comerica Park in Detroit will host a two-week festival and celebration of hockey that will draw thousands of fans and players. (Rick Osentoski-US PRESSWIRE)

    By Stu Hackel

    With today’s announcement that the next Winter Classic will be in Ann Arbor, Michigan, accompanied by a large number of other events in downtown Detroit, the NHL and the Red Wings are poised to take this event to a new level. This won’t be just a very special hockey game that has been designed to broaden the sport’s appeal through TV exposure on New Year’s Day. This is going to be an unprecedented celebration of hockey in a place that is not only one of America’s foremost centers of the sport, but also one of America’s most troubled cities, one that is fighting quite hard to rebound against economic hardship and an awful reputation.

    The most telling remarks made at today’s news conference were those of Detroit Mayor Dave Bing, a former NBA star, who acknowledged that he doesn’t always have a reason to smile in his current job. But he was smiling when he spoke at the Comerica Park event this morning because through the Red Wings and the NHL, this event can help address his city’s ongoing fiscal issues and its image.

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  • Published On Feb 09, 2012


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