You Are Viewing All Posts In The Patrick Kane Category

Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews ready for battle in Stanley Cup defense

Decrease fontDecrease font
Enlarge fontEnlarge font
Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews of the Chicago Blackhawks

As go Patrick Kane (88) and Jonathan Toews (19), so go the Stanley Cup champions. (Bill Wippert/Getty Images)

By Brian Hamilton

CHICAGO – At 11:42 a.m. on Monday, Patrick Kane stopped at the edge of the rink at Johnny’s Ice House West, the Blackhawks’ auxiliary practice facility. He wiped down his stick before he skated onto the ice, double-tapped the blade and then dumped over a bucket of pucks before he went to work. A minute later, Jonathan Toews joined him. Chicago’s captain picked up one of the scattered discs and stick-handled through the face-off circle before flicking a shot into the upper right corner of an empty net.

It was the first time since mid-March that the franchise cornerstones had skated together in public. They’d mostly been sequestered as they recovered from injuries – Kane’s knee, Toews’ nebulous “upper-body” – but here they were in full view as the Blackhawks’ defense of their Stanley Cup championship began. And not one other skater on the roster joined them. Aside from two goalies, it was just Kane and Toews and 20 brisk minutes of hard work. This was a fitting opening scene for the postseason: Chicago will go nowhere in the playoffs without its two Conn Smythe Trophy winners drawing everyone’s attention. But the Blackhawks are also going to need more than just Kane and Toews.

“The first four games I was out, the team went 4-0,” Toews said with a smile, moments after leaving the ice and towelling off his sweat-soaked scalp. “It was looking pretty good for a while there. Our team has always done well dealing with key players being hurt, whether it’s guys like [Marian] Hossa or [Patrick Sharp] or Kaner, whatever. We’ve always found ways to step it up. Now when you get some top players back, it’s always about those guys fitting in and being part of the room. Nothing changes that way.”

Read More…


  • Published On Apr 17, 2014
  • Bauer’s OD1N “concept car” equipment to be showcased at Sochi Olympics

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font

    By Michael Blinn

    Hockey equipment is already at its apex. Everything is lighter, faster and as protective as possible.

    Or so we thought.

    On Thursday, Bauer announced a new line of player and goalie equipment, dubbed the OD1N. It’s safe to say that we’ve made it to the future–and it’s pretty sweet.

    First, some background:

    In early December, an image made its way around the hockey internet of some pretty crazy-looking skates in action. Other than a blurry Bauer logo, it was anyone’s guess as to what they could be. More and more teaser photos came out, and Bauer dropped some tidbits:

    Read More…


  • Published On Dec 20, 2013
  • Sports Illustrated cover story previews the 2013-14 NHL season

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    Patrick Kane and SIdney Crosby on covers of Sports Illustrated's September 30, 2013 issue.

    SI’s NHL covers this week. (Photos by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images :: Patrick McDermott/NHLI via Getty)

    A new NHL season is here and the operative word is new. This week’s Sports Illustrated devotes 20 pages to previewing the realigned, revamped league with its new divisions, playoff format, rivalries, salary structure and host of outdoor games, six in all. Coming off a thrilling Stanley Cup Final that generated the best TV numbers in the league’s history, the outlook is certainly far brighter than it was at this time last year when the NHL was in the throes of its third lockout since 1995.

    “The NHL is practically all rainbows and unicorns at the start of 2013-14,” Michael Farber writes in his cover story. But there is one problem that has defied solution. Teams scored an average of 5.31 goals per game in 2013, the fewest since ’03-’04, the dreaded days of the dead puck era. “While the flow of the game has improved since the crackdown on hooking and holding, hockey’s red light district (the red goal light flashing, the siren, the roar, the celebration) is not the fun place it was in the not so distant past.”

    The NHL’s solution? Unleash goal scorers, like Pittsburgh’s Sidney Crosby, who graces our regional cover. (The national cover features Patrick Kane of the Blackhawks, the team that SI expects will become the first since 1998 to win back-to-back Stanley Cups. You can see both full covers in full below.)

    Read More…


  • Published On Sep 25, 2013
  • Must-See Video: Patrick Kane puts on a stickhandling clinic

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font

    Patrick Kane’s new commercial for Bauer may not inspire you to run out and pick up a couple of their new Vapor APX-2 sticks. But after you’ve finished watching you’ll probably want to pick up your jaw.

    We already knew Kane was a wizard with the puck. And truth be told, we know he could weave the same spell with an old Sher-Wood PMP 7070 as this new $300 high-tech model. The magic’s in the hands, not the wand, after all.

    But this is some seriously crazy juju he’s working in a spot that’s 100 percent live action, except for the camera-smashing bit at the end.

    And, amazingly, the whole thing took just 15-20 minutes to shoot.

    “When they had the idea and they told me how many pucks were going to be in the center I was like, ‘I don’t know if I could do it.’” Kane told the Chicago Tribune. “I tried it with a few and said, ‘why not throw all of them in there and see if I can do it?’

    “At first I didn’t think I was going to be able to do it with all the pucks in there but I guess as you get into it and get competitive, you want to try it out,” he said.


  • Published On Sep 13, 2013
  • Remembering the moments that defined the 2013 NHL season

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    Nail Yakupov channeled Theo Fleury in his tying goal against the Kings back in January. (Andy Devlin/Getty Images)

    Nail Yakupov channeled Theo Fleury in his tying goal against the Kings back in January. (Andy Devlin/Getty Images)

    By Allan Muir

    I always have the best intentions at the beginning of each season to make a running tab of the moments most worth remembering. And, much like my determination to get back into game shape, it hasn’t happened yet.

    Still, it wasn’t too hard to come up with a list now that we’re at season’s end. The games offered enough highlights–and lowlights–to fill a full-length schedule. Here are my favorites:

    The Yakupov Slide: With the goalie pulled and Edmonton trailing Los Angeles by one back in January, Nail Yakupov crafted the signature moment of his rookie season: batting a Taylor Hall rebound out of midair and putting it behind Kings goalie Jonathan Quick with just 4.7 seconds left on the clock. He took a lot of grief for his spontaneous Theo Fleury impression, but it was a beautiful tally at a key moment. That’s exactly the kind of goal that calls for an over-the-top celly (yep, celly). You want to follow a sport that’s had all the life sucked out of it? Watch the NFL.

    Read More…


  • Published On Apr 26, 2013
  • Jamie Benn signs; Quick hits from Blackhawks at Stars

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font
    hossa-muir

    Marian Hossa got the game-winner in OT as the Blackhawks stayed perfect. (Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports)

    By Allan Muir

    • Win, lose or draw, the big story in Dallas was going to be the signing of restricted free agent Jamie Benn. More accurately, his agreement to sign. That’s an important distinction because the actual papers won’t be inked until today, and that poses a bit of a problem. Benn is expected to practice with the team, but he’s unlikely to be available for Saturday’s home game against the Blues. The reason? He can’t obtain his work visa until the contract is official and a same-day turnaround on a Friday isn’t likely.

    • The contract itself — five years, $26.25 million — is a win/win. Benn wanted shorter term and more money, but he had no real leverage to get both. So this isn’t the deal he wanted, but he won a commitment that sets him up for life … and he’ll still be in his prime (28) when it is finished, an ideal point at which to break the bank. The Stars have to be thrilled with both the term, which keeps him locked in for the rebuild, and the cap hit, which is lower than several recent deals for roughly comparable players like Jeff Skinner and Travis Zajac.

    • The fans at the AAC were so excited by the news when it was announced midway through the second period that they probably didn’t notice the odd wording that credited Tom Gagliardi and Joe Nieuwendyk with signing Benn. Obviously it’s Gagliardi’s money, so yes, he did the deal…but when have you ever heard put that way? It’s almost always the team or the GM that gets credited with the deal. Maybe this is Gagliardi’s way of trying to prop up his image in a sports landscape dominated by celebu-owners Jerry Jones and Mark Cuban.

    Read More…


  • Published On Jan 25, 2013
  • Trade talk pot is boiling

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font

    One to watch: hot blueline prospect Justin Schultz may dodge the Ducks by not signing with them and could be grabbed by another team without having to make a trade for him. (Brace Hemmelgarn/Icon SMI)

    By Stu Hackel

    We wrote late last week that the trade and free agent rumor mill was heating up. Today it is starting to boil.

    There’s always talk about who might be on the move when the calendar hits June, but this gumbo of gossip has some unique ingredients. For starters, the Entry Draft starts on Friday and this year’s draft class is not considered to be particularly strong. With a number of teams holding high picks and wanting to change their fortunes sooner rather than later, dealing them for established talent might be the way to go. Throw in a few disgruntled big name players who desire new addresses and teams facing salary cap issues while trying to re-sign some of their unrestricted free agents before they hit the market on July 1, and you’ve got a buffet of  buzz.

    Read More…


  • Published On Jun 19, 2012
  • A vanishing shot; Semin’s enigma

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font

    Alex Semin of the Washington Capitals is a supremely talented player, but maddeningly inconsistent. (Russell Lansford/Icon SMI)

    By Stu Hackel

    One of hockey’s most breathtaking plays has nearly vanished from the NHL: the goal scored by a player who zips down the wing and blows a slap shot past the goaltender.

    “You can’t do that kind of shot today,” Avalanche forward Matt Duchene​ told my SI.com cohort Adrian Dater at his regular Denver Post gig. “It’s not going to work. The goalies are going to make the save, and you can’t even take the time to wind up like that off the rush. The (defenseman) is going to get to you and take away the puck or block the shot in the time it takes you to wind the stick back.”

    Read More…


  • Published On Dec 22, 2011
  • Sutter’s L.A. decision, big ice, and the NHL’s shootout sickness

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font

    Darryl Sutter has salvaged struggling teams as a coach, but his firebreathing approach takes a toll. (David E. Klutho/SI)

    By Stu Hackel

    UPDATED, DEC. 24: It appears that former Flames coach and GM Darryl Sutter has now decided to join the Kings as their new bench boss, according to Rich Hammond, who is the club’s official blogger. All that is preventing Sutter from taking over is immigration issues that are expected to be ironed out early this week, when it will become official. Is this a good hire?

    Not according to Eric Francis of The Calgary Sun. Francis notes that when Sutter took over coaching the Sharks in the late ’90s under then-GM Dean Lombardi, the team’s record improved for five consecutive seasons. Then, when Sutter took over as the Flames’ coach, he turned that franchise around as well, “pushing a rag-tag bunch of muckers to within one game of the Stanley Cup Final in 2004.”

    But Francis adds, “In Calgary, his act as a miserable taskmaster who couldn’t differentiate between winning and being a human being, wore thin with the players who were thrilled he finally booted himself upstairs to be GM.

    “The question is, can his ball-breaking, reign-of-terror approach work in today’s NHL?

    Read More…


  • Published On Dec 15, 2011
  • NHL’s deal with NBC yields a cornucopia of Thanksgiving treats

    Decrease fontDecrease font
    Enlarge fontEnlarge font

    The Bruins’ traditional post-Thanksgiving Day game, this year against the Red Wings, will launch NBC’s national coverage of the NHL five weeks earlier than usual. (Damian Strohmeyer/Sports Illustrated)

    By Stu Hackel

    On Nov. 29, 1991, the Bruins hosted the Canadiens in an afternoon game. It was the day after Thanksgiving and Boston defeated its fierce Montreal rivals 5-4 in overtime. Whether it was superstition, a strong fan response or smart marketing, the B’s repeated the post-Turkey Day match the following season, this time against the Hartford Whalers (again an OT victory for the home side) and this Friday afternoon game has been a fixture on Boston’s calendar ever since.

    Now, 20 years later, the NHL and NBC are turning this tradition into a special event, one that is emblematic of an innovative new era for a league historically considered second-rate in the areas of marketing and promotion.
    Read More…


  • Published On Nov 23, 2011


  •