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Vancouver Canucks’ Henrik Sedin leaves game against Sabres with injury

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After being honored for his 1,000 NHL game milestone, Henrik Sedin left Sunday's game against the Sabres with an apparent leg injury. (Jeff Vinnick/NHLI via Getty Images)

Henrik Sedin and the Canucks have endured a painful, disappointing season. (Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images)

By Darian Somers

Henrik Sedin didn’t get to finish his 1,000th NHL game.

After being honored with a pregame ceremony, Vancouver’s captain was forced to leave Sunday’s match against Buffalo after suffering an apparent leg injury with about five minutes left to play in the second period. He was skating behind the net when he got caught up with Sabres forward Tyler Ennis, who fell, slightly bending Sedin’s leg. Sedin finished his shift, but needed attention on the bench before he was taken down the tunnel to the dressing room. He didn’t return.

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  • Published On Mar 23, 2014
  • Henrik Sedin should listen to John Tortorella, skip Sochi Olympics

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    By Allan Muir

    Maybe Steven Stamkos was lucky.

    His Olympic dream wasn’t his own to end. When it came time to make a decision on whether his broken leg had healed sufficiently to allow him to suit up for Team Canada, his doctors stepped in and mercifully pulled the plug.

    MUIR: Stamkos ruled out of Sochi | Was St. Louis the best replacement pick?

    The decision won’t be so bloodless for Henrik Sedin.

    The Canucks announced this morning that they would shut down their captain for the team’s final two pre-Olympic games after he was was ineffective playing through a rib injury on Tuesday night against the Bruins.

    It’s the right call for the team and the player. Anyone who watched the game could tell that breathing, let alone the slightest contact, was agony for Sedin. Outside of a boatload of courage, he doesn’t bring much value to the table in the short term. It makes sense, then, for Vancouver to take the long view of his recovery.

    But can Sedin do the same?

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  • Published On Feb 06, 2014
  • Henrik, Daniel Sedin sign twin deals to stay with Vancouver Canucks

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    By Allan Muir

    Sometimes, things work out exactly the way they should.

    You know, like when the dog that gets lost on the family vacation eventually finds his way back home, or the way Indiana Jones’ hat always blows back to him whenever it gets knocked off his head.

    That’s the sort of predictable but pitch-perfect note that recent negotiations between the Canucks and the Sedin Twins should have ended on. And so they did.

    The twins signed matching four-year, $28 million extensions on Friday that will keep them with Vancouver through the 2017-18 season, essentially for the rest of their careers. That is exactly how it should be.

    The deals’ $7 million annual average value provides a fair wage to Henrik and Daniel, both of whom rank among the league’s top 10 scorers and deserve to be two of the NHL’s better-compensated players. But it’s not exactly an outrageous sum. In fact, they left money on the table that would have been theirs in free agency this summer. The new figure ties them with Boston’s Zdeno Chara for 25th highest-paid overall in 2014-15, and they could fall even farther down the charts after the summer’s free-agent spending frenzy. So it’s a number that both they and the Canucks can live with, even without a full understanding of where the salary cap is heading.

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  • Published On Nov 01, 2013
  • NHL tries to restore order

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    Refs seem to have rediscovered the idea that sending a player to the box and leaving his team in a potentially costly penalty-kill is one of the best ways to curb on-ice mayhem. (Mark Goldman/Icon SMI)

    By Stu Hackel

    Perhaps Wednesday will go down as the day the NHL regained some control over the Stanley Cup playoffs and did it in the most logical manner – having the referees call penalties rather than “let the boys play.”

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  • Published On Apr 19, 2012
  • Canucks fading as stretch run begins

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    Roberto Luongo’s lousy play has Canucks fans and media calling for him to take a seat on the pine. (Kathleen Hinkel/Icon SMI)

    By Stu Hackel

    It’s a difficult task to repeat as a champion in the NHL. No Stanley Cup winner has done it since the Red Wings in 1997 and 1998. But it’s also tough just to reach the Cup final in consecutive years. Only five clubs have managed that since 1988 which, if my math is correct — always a tricky proposition — means that almost 90 percent of the time, teams don’t get a return trip to the fourth round.

    The way Canucks are playing right now, they look like they’ll be hanging with that 90 percent.

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  • Published On Mar 15, 2012
  • Stats the NHL ought to keep

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    Montreal Canadiens defenseman Josh Gorges is leading the NHL in blocked shots (150), but which player has had the most shots blocked so far this season? (Photo by Richard Wolowicz/NHLI via Getty Images)

    By Stu Hackel

    By its nature, hockey is not a game that is easily reducible to numbers. An entire industry has sprung up around baseball statistics, but stats can occasionally take some of the fun out of any game by reducing it to a dry abstraction.  Stats not only have their downside on the entertainment front, they can mislead about a player’s real value.

    For example, defensive defensemen and checking forwards often don’t get the credit they deserve because they don’t post gaudy point totals, and some people still find plus-minus to be more of a team stat than a reflection of an individual player’s abilities. And sometimes numbers lie.

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  • Published On Feb 08, 2012
  • Canucks trying to avoid Cup Final hangover

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    Who are those men in blue? Defenseman Keith Ballard is one of the few recognizable names that has been appearing in preseason games for the Canucks this year. (Anne-Marie Sorvin-US PRESSWIRE)

    By Stu Hackel

    With repeat runs to championship series or games in team sports increasingly unlikely these days, the Vancouver Canucks are trying to increase their chances by managing their roster a bit differently. It’s a long, long year for any NHL club, and even longer for a team that goes deep in the playoffs, so the Canucks know they’re going to need all sorts of luck, breaks, good health and other intangibles aside from consistently superior performances.

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  • Published On Sep 27, 2011
  • A Cup full of brutal, mystifying uncertainty

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    In a series full of enigmas, the biggest has been Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo, who unwisely gave the Bruins plenty of emotional ammo before Game 6 and then inexplicably turned into a sieve. (Reuters)

    By Stu Hackel

    So we’ll go to a seventh game in the Stanley Cup Final after Boston beat Vancouver 5-2 on Monday, and the only thing one can say for certain is that the last game of the season will be on Wednesday.

    There’s no way to fully understand what has gone on in this series, one in which the home team always scores first and wins, the Canucks look like deserving champs at home and big-time chumps on the road, the Bruins sometimes throw the puck away like yesterday’s trash, sometimes more concerned with physical provocation (to which the Canucks don’t respond on the road) and seemingly more intent on hitting to injure than hitting to separate an opponent from the puck.

    We want the Stanley Cup Final to be the best hockey of the year. This isn’t. It has been great theater, but the quality of play hasn’t equaled the drama. Neither of these teams nor their fans care, of course. They don’t award the Stanley Cup based on style points.
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  • Published On Jun 14, 2011
  • What to watch for in Cup final Game 6

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    Win or lose, Bruins goalie Tim Thomas is the likely Conn Smythe winner. (Michael Ivins/US Presswire)

    By Stu Hackel

    With the Canucks back in Boston — site of their horror show Games 3 and 4 — and the Stanley Cup in the building, the Bruins will, as their coach Claude Julien says, hope “to create a Game 7.”

    The B’s will have to be better than they were on Friday in Vancouver, when the Canucks showed the physical dimension that was missing from their play during the two previous games. The Canucks took every opportunity to smash Boston players, outhitting them 47-27, forcing numerous turnovers (NHL stats had the takeaways at 15-6 in the Canucks’ favor), tightening their defensive play while getting a very strong game from Roberto Luongo, and doing all sorts of things that seemed unimaginable after Vancouver’s two-game massacre in Boston. After Game 4, we wrote that Vancouver would need a massive turnaround to halt Boston’s huge grab of the series’ momentum and we felt somewhat skeptical that they could. But that’s just what they did.
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  • Published On Jun 13, 2011
  • What to watch for in Cup final Game 5

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    As the stakes, tension and desperation rise, the feisty, physical play of Bruins goaltender Tim Thomas could ignite more nastiness in a Cup final that has been blemished by it. (Greg M. Cooper/US Presswire)

    By Stu Hackel

    This dramatic, nasty and sometimes ugly Stanley Cup Final resumes tonight in Vancouver and the stakes are obvious for both the Canucks and Bruins. If the home team loses, it faces the prospect of traveling back to Boston with the B’s having a chance to win the Stanley Cup on home ice, where they crushed the Canucks in two straight games. If the visitors lose, it will halt their mighty momentum and put the Canucks on the verge of the championship.

    We ventured a few thoughts on how the series has progressed over the first four games yesterday (If you missed that, here’s the link so you can catch up.) and while the series is tied 2-2, it feels more like a 2-0 lead for the Bruins, who sail into Vancouver with the wind at their backs. Whether the Canucks can dig deep and raise the level of their play to match and overcome what the B’s threw at them in Games 3 and 4 is the overriding question for everything that will happen tonight.
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  • Published On Jun 10, 2011


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